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Avoid Big Vet Bills! 10 Horse Wound Care Prevention Tips

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Although horses can sustain injuries any time of the year, horses are especially prone to injury in the winter. Horse accident prevention begins from the ground up. Keep vet bills at bay with these 10 Winter Wound Prevention Tips: snow horse

  1. Beware of Ice: Untreated icy spots around water troughs, on concrete walkways, or any surface your horses tread on is a formula for disaster. Use a non-toxic ice-melting product where needed, and never lead a horse over an icy surface. 
  2. When in doubt, don't turn out: If your turnout's footing is frozen solid, slick from recent rain or snow, or is very muddy, the safest way to manage risk of injury is to keep your horse in until conditions improve.
  3. Eliminate poopsicles: Frozen manure balls are equivalent to egg-sized rocks. If not picked up, your horse can bruise the sole of his foot to the point it is bruised so badly that it abscesses.
  4. Prevent Hoof Snowballs: If not being ridden extensively, pull your horse's shoes in the winter. Horseshoes tend to pack snow into hard uneven snowballs and they also make excellent ice-skates. If shoeing is necessary, add pads under the shoes to prevent sole bruising and uneven snow packing.
  5. Avoid Blanket Rubbing: If the problem is severe enough, the blanket may not only be rubbing hair off, but the top layers of skin as well! The most common cause of rubbing is an ill fitting blanket. Click here for tips to properly fit your horse for a blanket.
  6. Keep a hammer handy: A single protruding nail or screw left for a horse to brush against can injure your horse. Take care of potential problems right away with a hammer you keep on hand. Always check fencing to ensure your horse has no chance to escape and be prone to injury. 
  7. Walk the pasture: Walk your horse's enclosures for any trash, debris or any other hazards that may lead to injury.
  8. Eliminate leg traps: Anything with a four-inch opening is capable of trapping a horse if he puts a foot through it. Common culprits include, gaps beneath stall doors and types of woven fencing designed for sheep and cattle.
  9. Keep herd dynamics in mind: Reduce costly kick injuries by keeping feed piles spread out with no tight corners where a low ranked horse can't get away from an aggressor. 
  10. Provide Hay: Feeding good quality hay in sufficient amounts is one of the best ways to help horses stay warm. Feed digestion produces heat, with high fibers such as hay releasing the greatest amount of heat. Hay is also a great boredom buster, keeping your horse busy and out of trouble!
A horse drinks 8 to 12 gallons of water per day, and horses prefer water temperatures of about 45-65 degrees Fahrenheit and tend to drink less when water is cold. Keep in mind that research tells us that a horse cannot stay hydrated by eating snow alone. Decreased water consumption can lead to colic, so make every effort to ensure your horses are drinking enough. Avoid a frozen water supply by insulating pipes and faucets with heat tape or other insulation materials -- check with your local hardware store for recommendations. If you use a hose, find a way to drain it each night so it doesn’t freeze. Read on for a few ways to manage winter water supplies for horses. - See more at: http://cs.thehorse.com/blogs/smart-horse-keeping/archive/2010/11/15/set-up-a-winter-water-supply.aspx#sthash.cmcsFY5Z.dpuf

Corona Ointment is the ideal wound care treatment to have on hand in case an injury should occur:

  • Voted by the Horse Journal as their horse wound care treatment of choice!
  • Helps promote healing of minor wounds
  • Prevents drying and chapping of skin
  • Creates barrier against moisture, dirt, and insects
  • Corona can be safely applied with no gloves
  • Safe for your canine too!!
A horse drinks 8 to 12 gallons of water per day, and horses prefer water temperatures of about 45-65 degrees Fahrenheit and tend to drink less when water is cold. Keep in mind that research tells us that a horse cannot stay hydrated by eating snow alone. Decreased water consumption can lead to colic, so make every effort to ensure your horses are drinking enough. Avoid a frozen water supply by insulating pipes and faucets with heat tape or other insulation materials -- check with your local hardware store for recommendations. If you use a hose, find a way to drain it each night so it doesn’t freeze. Read on for a few ways to manage winter water supplies for horses. - See more at: http://cs.thehorse.com/blogs/smart-horse-keeping/archive/2010/11/15/set-up-a-winter-water-supply.aspx#sthash.cmcsFY5Z.dpuf

 

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Gabby Gufler

Gabby Gufler

Gabby Gufler graduated from Truman State University in 2013 with a BS in Animal Science & Nutrition and a minor in Equine Science. Gabby currently works on Manna Pro’s marketing team, and enjoys competing regularly with her six horses.

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